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Consent & Chaperones

Consent

Before we begin examination or treatment we need your consent (or your parents if you are under 16) to do so. This can be given in a number of ways. It may be by a signature on a document (for example if some sort of “invasive” procedure is to be carried out – minor surgery etc.). It may be verbal (for example if the GP asks if he can look at your leg injury etc.). However it may also be implied. This means that you do not specifically give your consent, but your actions (for example rolling up your sleeve for a blood test or laying on the couch with your trousers unfastened for examination) state that you are happy to have the GP carry out his/her work. It is your right not to give consent, particularly if you are unhappy about any part of the procedure. Please let a GP know if you are unhappy and do not consent to being examined or treated, or if you require further clarification first.

Your consent must be informed. That means you must understand clearly what the procedure entails and how it will affect you. If in any doubt please ask. Information leaflets are available in the waiting area.


Chaperones

All patients are entitled to have a chaperone present for any consultation, examination or procedure where they consider one is required. The chaperone may be a family member or friend, but on occasions a formal chaperone may be preferred.

Patients are advised to ask for a chaperone if required, at the time of booking an appointment, if possible, so that arrangements can be made and the appointment is not delayed in any way. The healthcare professional may also require a chaperone to be present for certain consultations.

All staff are aware of and have received appropriate information in relation to this chaperone policy.

All trained chaperones understand their role and responsibilities and are competent to perform that role.

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